Planet Igalia WebKit

February 26, 2019

Frédéric Wang

Review of Igalia's Web Platform activities (H2 2018)

This blog post reviews Igalia’s activity around the Web Platform, focusing on the second semester of 2018.

Projects

MathML

During 2018 we have continued discussions to implement MathML in Chromium with Google and people interested in math layout. The project was finally launched early this year and we have encouraging progress. Stay tuned for more details!

Javascript

As mentioned in the previous report, Igalia has proposed and developed the specification for BigInt, enabling math on arbitrary-sized integers in JavaScript. We’ve continued to land patches for BigInt support in SpiderMonkey and JSC. For the latter, you can watch this video demonstrating the current support. Currently, these two support are under a preference flag but we hope to make it enable by default after we are done polishing the implementations. We also added support for BigInt to several Node.js APIs (e.g. fs.Stat or process.hrtime.bigint).

Regarding “object-oriented” features, we submitted patches private and public instance fields support to JSC and they are pending review. At the same time, we are working on private methods for V8

We contributed other nice features to V8 such as a spec change for template strings and iterator protocol, support for Object.fromEntries, Symbol.prototype.description, miscellaneous optimizations.

At TC39, we maintained or developed many proposals (BigInt, class fields, private methods, decorators, …) and led the ECMAScript Internationalization effort. Additionally, at the WebAssembly Working Group we edited the WebAssembly JS and Web API and early version of WebAssembly/ES Module integration specifications.

Last but not least, we contributed various conformance tests to test262 and Web Platform Tests to ensure interoperability between the various features mentioned above (BigInt, Class fields, Private methods…). In Node.js, we worked on the new Web Platform Tests driver with update automation and continued porting and fixing more Web Platform Tests in Node.js core.

We also worked on the new Web Platform Tests driver with update automation, and continued porting and fixing more Web Platform Tests in Node.js core. Outside of core, we implemented the initial JavaScript API for llnode, a Node.js/V8 plugin for the LLDB debugger.

Accessibility

Igalia has continued its involvement at the W3C. We have achieved the following:

We are also collaborating with Google to implement ATK support in Chromium. This work will make it possible for users of the Orca screen reader to use Chrome/Chromium as their browser. During H2 we began implementing the foundational accessibility support. During H1 2019 we will continue this work. It is our hope that sufficient progress will be made during H2 2019 for users to begin using Chrome with Orca.

Web Platform Predictability

On Web Platform Predictability, we’ve continued our collaboration with AMP to do bug fixes and implement new features in WebKit. You can read a review of the work done in 2018 on the AMP blog post.

We have worked on a lot of interoperability issues related to editing and selection thanks to financial support from Bloomberg. For example when deleting the last cell of a table some browsers keep an empty table while others delete the whole table. The latter can be problematic, for example if users press backspace continuously to delete a long line, they can accidentally end up deleting the whole table. This was fixed in Chromium and WebKit.

Another issue is that style is lost when transforming some text into list items. When running execCommand() with insertOrderedList/insertUnorderedList on some styled paragraph, the new list item loses the original text’s style. This behavior is not interoperable and we have proposed a fix so that Firefox, Edge, Safari and Chrome behave the same for this operation. We landed a patch for Chromium. After discussion with Apple, it was decided not to implement this change in Safari as it would break some iOS rich text editor apps, mismatching the required platform behavior.

We have also been working on CSS Grid interoperability. We imported Web Platform Tests into WebKit (cf bugs 191515 and 191369 and at the same time completing the missing features and bug fixes so that browsers using WebKit are interoperable, passing 100% of the Grid test suite. For details, see 191358, 189582, 189698, 191881, 191938, 170175, 191473 and 191963. Last but not least, we are exporting more than 100 internal browser tests to the Web Platform test suite.

CSS

Bloomberg is supporting our work to develop new CSS features. One of the new exciting features we’ve been working on is CSS Containment. The goal is to improve the rendering performance of web pages by isolating a subtree from the rest of the document. You can read details on Manuel Rego’s blog post.

Regarding CSS Grid Layout we’ve continued our maintenance duties, bug triage of the Chromium and WebKit bug trackers, and fixed the most severe bugs. One change with impact on end users was related to how percentages row tracks and gaps work in grid containers with indefinite size, the last spec resolution was implemented in both Chromium and WebKit. We are finishing the level 1 of the specification with some missing/incomplete features. First we’ve been working on the new Baseline Alignment algorithm (cf. CSS WG issues 1039, 1365 and 1409). We fixed related issues in Chromium and WebKit. Similarly, we’ve worked on Content Alignment logic (see CSS WG issue 2557) and resolved a bug in Chromium. The new algorithm for baseline alignment caused an important performance regression for certain resizing use cases so we’ve fixed them with some performance optimization and that landed in Chromium.

We have also worked on various topics related to CSS Text 3. We’ve fixed several bugs to increase the pass rate for the Web Platform test suite in Chromium such as bugs 854624, 900727 and 768363. We are also working on a new CSS value ‘break-spaces’ for the ‘white-space’ property. For details, see the CSS WG discussions: issue 2465 and pull request. We implemented this new property in Chromium under a CSSText3BreakSpaces flag. Additionally, we are currently porting this implementation to Chromium’s new layout engine ‘LayoutNG’. We have plans to implement this feature in WebKit during the second semester.

Multimedia

  • WebRTC: The libwebrtc branch is now upstreamed in WebKit and has been tested with popular servers.
  • Media Source Extensions: WebM MSE support is upstreamed in WebKit.
  • We implemented basic support for <video> and <audio> elements in Servo.

Other activities

Web Engines Hackfest 2018

Last October, we organized the Web Engines Hackfest at our A Coruña office. It was a great event with about 70 attendees from all the web engines, thank you to all the participants! As usual, you can find more information on the event wiki including link to slides and videos of speakers.

TPAC 2018

Again in October, but this time in Lyon (France), 12 people from Igalia attended TPAC and participated in several discussions on the different meetings. Igalia had a booth there showcasing several demos of our last developments running on top of WPE (a WebKit port for embedded devices). Last, Manuel Rego gave a talk on the W3C Developers Meetup about how to contribute to CSS.

This.Javascript: State of Browsers

In December, we also participated with other browser developers to the online This.Javascript: State of Browsers event organized by ThisDot. We talked more specifically about the current work in WebKit.

New Igalians

We are excited to announce that new Igalians are joining us to continue our Web platform effort:

  • Cathie Chen, a Chinese engineer with about 10 years of experience working on browsers. Among other contributions to Chromium, she worked on the new LayoutNG code and added support for list markers.

  • Caio Lima a Brazilian developer who recently graduated from the Federal University of Bahia. He participated to our coding experience program and notably worked on BigInt support in JSC.

  • Oriol Brufau a recent graduate in math from Barcelona who is also involved in the CSSWG and the development of various browser engines. He participated to our coding experience program and implemented the CSS Logical Properties and Values in WebKit and Chromium.

Coding Experience Programs

Last fall, Sven Sauleau joined our coding experience program and started to work on various BigInt/WebAssembly improvements in V8.

Conclusion

We are thrilled with the web platform achievements we made last semester and we look forward to more work on the web platform in 2019!

February 26, 2019 11:00 PM

Miguel A. Gómez

Hole punching in WPE

As you may (or may not) know, WPE (and WebKitGtk+ if the proper flags are enabled) uses OpengGL textures to render the video frames during playback.

In order to do this, WPE creates a playbin and uses a custom bin as videosink. This bin is composed by some GStreamer-GL components together with an appsink. The GL components ensure that the video frames are uploaded to OpenGL textures, while the appsink allows the player to get a signal when a new frame arrives. When this signal is emitted, the player gets the frame as a texture from the appsink and sends it to the accelerated compositor to be composed with the rest of the layers of the page.

This process is quite fast due to the hardware accelerated drawings, and as the video frames are just another layer that is composited, it allows them to be transformed and animated: the video can be scaled, rotated, moved around the page, etc.

But there are some platforms where this approach is not viable, maybe because there’s no OpenGL support, or it’s too slow, or maybe the platform has some kind of fast path support to take the decoded frames to the display. For these cases, the typical solution is to draw a transparent rectangle on the brower, in the position where the video should be, and then use some platform dependent way to put the video frames in a display plane below the browser, so they are visible through the transparent rectangle. This approach is called hole punching, as it refers to punching a hole in the browser to be able to see the video.

At Igalia we think that supporting this feature is interesting, and following our philosophy of collaborating upstream as much as possible, we have added two hole punching approaches to the WPE upstream trunk: GStreamer hole punch and external hole punch.

GStreamer hole punch

The idea behind this implementation is to use the existent GStreamer based MediaPlayer to perform the media playback, but replace the appsink (and maybe other GStreamer elements) with a platform dependant video sink that is in charge of putting the video frames on the display. This can be enabled with the -DUSE_GSTREAMER_HOLEPUNCH flag.

Of course, the current implementation is not complete cause the platform dependent bits need to be added to have the full functionality. What it currently does is to use a fakevideosink so the video frames are not shown, and draw the transparent rectangle on the position where the video should be. If you enable the feature and play a video, you’ll see the transparent rectangle and you’ll be able to hear the video sound (and even use the video controls as they work), but nothing else will happen.

In order to have the full functionality there are a couple of places in the code that need to be modified to create the appropriate platform dependend elements. These two places are inside MediaPlayerPrivateGStreamerBase.cpp, and they are the createHolePunchVideoSink() and setRectangleToVideoSink() functions.

GstElement* MediaPlayerPrivateGStreamerBase::createHolePunchVideoSink()
{
    // Here goes the platform-dependant code to create the videoSink. As a default
    // we use a fakeVideoSink so nothing is drawn to the page.
    GstElement* videoSink =  gst_element_factory_make("fakevideosink", nullptr);

    return videoSink;
}
static void setRectangleToVideoSink(GstElement* videoSink, const IntRect& rect)
{
    // Here goes the platform-dependant code to set to the videoSink the size
    // and position of the video rendering window. Mark them unused as default.
    UNUSED_PARAM(videoSink);
    UNUSED_PARAM(rect);
}

The first one, createHolePunchVideoSink() needs to be modified to create the appropriate video sink to use for the platform. This video sink needs to have some method that allows setting the position where the video frames are to be displayed, and the size they should have. And this is where setRectangleToVideoSink() comes into play. Whenever the transparent rectangle is painted by the browser, it will tell the video sink to render the frames to the appropriate position, and it does so using that function. So you need to modify that function to use the appropriate way to set the size and position to the video sink.

And that’s all. Once those changes are made the feature is complete, and the video should be placed exactly where the transparent rectangle is.

Something to take into account is that the size and position of the video rectangle are defined by the CSS values of the video element. The rectangle won’t be adjusted to fit the aspect ratio of the video, as that must be done by the platform video sink.

Also, the video element allows some animations to be performed: it can be translated and scaled, and it will properly notify the video sink about the animated changes. But, of course, it doesn’t support rotation or 3D transformations (as the normal video playback does). Take into account that there might be a small desynchronization between the transparent rectangle and the video frames size and position, due to the asynchronicity of some function calls.

Playing a video with GStreamer hole punch enabled.

External hole punch

Unlike the previous feature, this one doesn’t rely at all on GStreamer to perform the media playback. Instead, it just paints the transparent rectangle and lets the playback to be handled entirely by an external player.

Of course, there’s still the matter about how to synchronize the transparent rectangle position and the external player. There would be two ways to do this:

  • Implement a new WebKit MediaPlayerPrivate class that would communicate with the external player (through sockets, the injected bundle or any other way). WPE would use that to tell the platform media player what to play and where to render the result. This is completely dependant of the platform, and the most complex solution, but it would allow to use the browser to play content from any page without any change. But precisely as it’s completely platform dependant, this is not valid approach for upstream.
  • Use javascript to communicate with the native player, telling it what to play and where, and WPE would just paint the transparent rectangle. The problem with this is that we need to have control of the page to add the javascript code that controls the native player, but on the other hand, we can implement a generic approach on WPE to paint the transparent rectangle. This is the option that was implemented upstream.

So, how can this feature be used? It’s enabled by using the -DUSE_EXTERNAL_HOLEPUNCH flag, and what it does is add a new dummy MediaPlayer to WPE that’s selected to play content of type video/holepunch. This dummy MediaPlayer will draw the transparent rectangle on the page, according to the CSS values defined, and won’t do anything else. It’s up to the page owners to add the javascript code required to initiate the playback with the native player and position the output in the appropriate place under the transparent rectangle. To be a bit more specific, the dummy player will draw the transparent rectangle once the type has been set to video/holepunch and load() is called on the player. If you have any doubt about how to make this work, you can give a look to the video-player-holepunch-external.html test inside the ManualTests/wpe directory.

This implementation doesn’t support animating the size and position of the video… well, it really does, as the transparent rectangle will be properly animated, but you would need to animate the native player’s output as well, and syncing the rectangle area and the video output is going to be a challenging task.

As a last detail, controls can be enabled using this hole punch implementation, but they are useless. As WPE doesn’t know anything about the media playback that’s happening, the video element controls can’t be used to handle it, so it’s just better to keep them disabled.

Using both implementations together

You may be wondering, is it possible to use both implementations at the same time? Indeed it is!! You may be using the GStreamer holepunch to perform media playback with some custom GStreamer elements. At some point you may find a video that is not supported by GStreamer and you can just set the type of the video element to video/holepunch and start the playback with the native player. And once that video is finished, start using the GStreamer MediaPlayer again.

Availability

Both hole punch features will be available on the upcoming stable 2.24 release (and, of course, on 2.25 development releases). I hope they are useful for you!

by magomez at February 26, 2019 10:25 AM

February 11, 2019

Víctor Jáquez

Review of Igalia’s Multimedia Activities (2018/H2)

This is the first semiyearly report about Igalia’s activities around multimedia, covering the second half of 2018.

Great length of this report was exposed in Phil’s talk surveying mutimedia development in WebKitGTK and WPE:

WebKit Media Source Extensions (MSE)

MSE is a specification that allows JS to generate media streams for playback for Web browsers that support HTML 5 video and audio.

Last semester we upstreamed the support to WebM format in WebKitGTK with the related patches in GStreamer, particularly in qtdemux, matroskademux elements.

WebKit Encrypted Media Extensions (EME)

EME is a specification for enabling playback of encrypted content in Web bowsers that support HTML 5 video.

In a downstream project for WPE WebKit we managed to have almost full test coverage in the YoutubeTV 2018 test suite.

We merged our contributions in upstream, WebKit and GStreamer, most of what is legal to publish, for example, making demuxers aware of encrypted content and make them to send protection events with the initialization data and the encrypted caps, in order to select later the decryption key.

We started to coordinate the upstreaming process of a new implementation of CDM (Content Decryption Module) abstraction and there will be even changes in that abstraction.

Lighting talk about EME implementation in WPE/WebKitGTK in GStreamer Conference 2018.

WebKit WebRTC

WebRTC consists of several interrelated APIs and real time protocols to enable Web applications and sites to captures audio, or A/V streams, and exchange them between browsers without requiring an intermediary.

We added GStreamer interfaces to LibWebRTC, to use it for the network part, while using GStreamer for the media capture and processing. All that was upstreamed in 2018 H2.

Thibault described thoroughly the tasks done for this achievement.

Talk about WebRTC implementation in WPE/WebKitGTK in WebEngines hackfest 2018.

Servo/media

Servo is a browser engine written in Rust designed for high parallelization and high GPU usage.

We added basic support for <video> and <audio> media elements in Servo. Later on, we added the GstreamerGL bindings for Rust in gstreamer-rs to render GL textures from the GStreamer pipeline in Servo.

Lighting talk in the GStreamer Conference 2018.

GstWPE

Taking an idea from the GStreamer Conference, we developed a GStreamer source element that wraps WPE. With this source element, it is possible to blend a web page and video in a single video stream; that is, the output of a Web browser (to say, a rendered web page) is used as a video source of a GStreamer pipeline: GstWPE. The element is already merged in the gst-plugins-bad repository.

Talk about GstWPE in FOSDEM 2019

Demo #1

Demo #2

GStreamer VA-API and gst-MSDK

At last, but not the least, we continued helping with the maintenance of GStreamer-VAAPI and gst-msdk, with code reviewing and on-going migration of the internal library to GObject.

Other activities

The second half of 2018 was also intense in terms of conferences and hackfest for the team:


Thanks to bear with us along all this blog post and to keeping under your radar our work.

by vjaquez at February 11, 2019 12:52 PM

January 08, 2019

Carlos García Campos

Epiphany automation mode

Last week I finally found some time to add the automation mode to Epiphany, that allows to run automated tests using WebDriver. It’s important to note that the automation mode is not expected to be used by users or applications to control the browser remotely, but only by WebDriver automated tests. For that reason, the automation mode is incompatible with a primary user profile. There are a few other things affected by the auotmation mode:

  • There’s no persistency. A private profile is created in tmp and only ephemeral web contexts are used.
  • URL entry is not editable, since users are not expected to interact with the browser.
  • An info bar is shown to notify the user that the browser is being controlled by automation.
  • The window decoration is orange to make it even clearer that the browser is running in automation mode.

So, how can I write tests to be run in Epiphany? First, you need to install a recently enough selenium. For now, only the python API is supported. Selenium doesn’t have an Epiphany driver, but the WebKitGTK driver can be used with any WebKitGTK+ based browser, by providing the browser information as part of session capabilities.

from selenium import webdriver

options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
options.set_capability('browserName', 'Epiphany')
options.set_capability('version', '3.31.4')

ephy = webdriver.WebKitGTK(options=options, desired_capabilities={})
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

This is a very simple example that just opens Epiphany in automation mode, loads http://www.webkitgtk.org and closes Epiphany. A few comments about the example:

  • Version 3.31.4 will be the first one including the automation mode.
  • The parameter desired_capabilities shouldn’t be needed, but there’s a bug in selenium that has been fixed very recently.
  • WebKitGTKOptions.set_capability was added in selenium 3.14, if you have an older version you can use the following snippet instead
from selenium import webdriver

options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
capabilities = options.to_capabilities()
capabilities['browserName'] = 'Epiphany'
capabilities['version'] = '3.31.4'

ephy = webdriver.WebKitGTK(desired_capabilities=capabilities)
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

To simplify the driver instantation you can create your own Epiphany driver derived from the WebKitGTK one:

from selenium import webdriver

class Epiphany(webdriver.WebKitGTK):
    def __init__(self):
        options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
        options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
        options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
        options.set_capability('browserName', 'Epiphany')
        options.set_capability('version', '3.31.4')

        webdriver.WebKitGTK.__init__(self, options=options, desired_capabilities={})

ephy = Epiphany()
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

The same for selenium < 3.14

from selenium import webdriver

class Epiphany(webdriver.WebKitGTK):
    def __init__(self):
        options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
        options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
        options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
        capabilities = options.to_capabilities()
        capabilities['browserName'] = 'Epiphany'
        capabilities['version'] = '3.31.4'

        webdriver.WebKitGTK.__init__(self, desired_capabilities=capabilities)

ephy = Epiphany()
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

by carlos garcia campos at January 08, 2019 05:22 PM

December 08, 2018

Philippe Normand

Web overlay in GStreamer with WPEWebKit

After a year or two of hiatus I attended the GStreamer conference which happened in beautiful Edinburgh. It was great to meet the friends from the community again and learn about what’s going on in the multimedia world. The quality of the talks was great, the videos are published …

by Philippe Normand at December 08, 2018 02:09 PM

November 12, 2018

Michael Catanzaro

The GNOME (and WebKitGTK+) Networking Stack

WebKit currently has four network backends:

  • CoreFoundation (used by macOS and iOS, and thus Safari)
  • CFNet (used by iTunes on Windows… I think only iTunes?)
  • cURL (used by most Windows applications, also PlayStation)
  • libsoup (used by WebKitGTK+ and WPE WebKit)

One guess which of those we’re going to be talking about in this post. Yeah, of course, libsoup! If you’re not familiar with libsoup, it’s the GNOME HTTP library. Why is it called libsoup? Because before it was an HTTP library, it was a SOAP library. And apparently somebody thought that when Mexican people say “soap,” it often sounds like “soup,” and also thought that this was somehow both funny and a good basis for naming a software library. You can’t make this stuff up.

Anyway, libsoup is built on top of GIO’s sockets APIs. Did you know that GIO has Object wrappers for BSD sockets? Well it does. If you fancy lower-level APIs, create a GSocket and have a field day with it. Want something a bit more convenient? Use GSocketClient to create a GSocketConnection connected to a GNetworkAddress. Pretty straightforward. Everything parallels normal BSD sockets, but the API is nice and modern and GObject, and that’s really all there is to know about it. So when you point WebKitGTK+ at an HTTP address, libsoup is using those APIs behind the scenes to handle connection establishment. (We’re glossing over details like “actually implementing HTTP” here. Trust me, libsoup does that too.)

Things get more fun when you want to load an HTTPS address, since we have to add TLS to the picture, and we can’t have TLS code in GIO or GLib due to this little thing called “copyright law.” See, there are basically three major libraries used to implement TLS on Linux, and they all have problems:

  • OpenSSL is by far the most popular, but it’s, hm, shall we say technically non-spectacular. There are forks, but the forks have problems too (ask me about BoringSSL!), so forget about them. The copyright problem here is that the OpenSSL license is incompatible with the GPL. (Boring details: Red Hat waves away this problem by declaring OpenSSL a system library qualifying for the GPL’s system library exception. Debian has declared the opposite, so Red Hat’s choice doesn’t gain you anything if you care about Debian users. The OpenSSL developers are trying to relicense to the Apache license to fix this, but this process is taking forever, and the Apache license is still incompatible with GPLv2, so this would make it impossible to use GPLv2+ software except under the terms of GPLv3+. Yada yada details.) So if you are writing a library that needs to be used by GPL applications, like say GLib or libsoup or WebKit, then it would behoove you to not use OpenSSL.
  • GnuTLS is my favorite from a technical standpoint. Its license is LGPLv2+, which is unproblematic everywhere, but some of its dependencies are licensed LGPLv3+, and that’s uncomfortable for many embedded systems vendors, since LGPLv3+ contains some provisions that make it difficult to deny you your freedom to modify the LGPLv3+ software. So if you rely on embedded systems vendors to fund the development of your library, like say libsoup or WebKit, then you’re really going to want to avoid GnuTLS.
  • NSS is used by Firefox. I don’t know as much about it, because it’s not as popular. I get the impression that it’s more designed for the needs of Firefox than as a Linux system library, but it’s available, and it works, and it has no license problems.

So naturally GLib uses NSS to avoid the license issues of OpenSSL and GnuTLS, right?

Haha no, it uses a dynamically-loadable extension point system to allow you to pick your choice of OpenSSL or GnuTLS! (Support for NSS was started but never finished.) This is OK because embedded systems vendors don’t use GPL applications and have no problems with OpenSSL, while desktop Linux users don’t produce tivoized embedded systems and have no problems with LGPLv3. So if you’re using desktop Linux and point WebKitGTK+ at an HTTPS address, then GLib is going to load a GIO extension point called glib-networking, which implements all of GIO’s TLS APIs — notably GTlsConnection and GTlsCertificate — using GnuTLS. But if you’re building an embedded system, you simply don’t build or install glib-networking, and instead build a different GIO extension point called glib-openssl, and libsoup will create GTlsConnection and GTlsCertificate objects based on OpenSSL instead. Nice! And if you’re Centricular and you’re building GStreamer for Windows, you can use yet another GIO extension point, glib-schannel, for your native Windows TLS goodness, all hidden behind GTlsConnection so that GStreamer (or whatever application you’re writing) doesn’t have to know about SChannel or OpenSSL or GnuTLS or any of that sad complexity.

Now you know why the TLS extension point system exists in GIO. Software licenses! And you should not be surprised to learn that direct use of any of these crypto libraries is banned in libsoup and WebKit: we have to cater to both embedded system developers and to GPL-licensed applications. All TLS library use is hidden behind the GTlsConnection API, which is really quite nice to use because it inherits from GIOStream. You ask for a TLS connection, have it handed to you, and then read and write to it without having to deal with any of the crypto details.

As a recap, the layering here is: WebKit -> libsoup -> GIO (GLib) -> glib-networking (or glib-openssl or glib-schannel).

So when Epiphany fails to load a webpage, and you’re looking at a TLS-related error, glib-networking is probably to blame. If it’s an HTTP-related error, the fault most likely lies in libsoup. Same for any other GNOME applications that are having connectivity troubles: they all use the same network stack. And there you have it!

P.S. The glib-openssl maintainers are helping merge glib-openssl into glib-networking, such that glib-networking will offer a choice of GnuTLS or OpenSSL and obsoleting glib-openssl. This is still a work in progress. glib-schannel will be next!

P.S.S. libcurl also gives you multiple choices of TLS backend, but makes you choose which at build time, whereas with GIO extension points it’s actually possible to choose at runtime from the selection of installed extension points. The libcurl approach is fine in theory, but creates some weird problems, e.g. different backends with different bugs are used on different distributions. On Fedora, it used to use NSS, but now uses OpenSSL, which is fine for Fedora, but would be a license problem elsewhere. Debian actually builds several different backends and gives you a choice, unlike everywhere else. I digress.

by Michael Catanzaro at November 12, 2018 04:51 AM

November 07, 2018

Michael Catanzaro

Mesa Update Breaks WebKitGTK+ in Fedora 29

If you’re using Fedora and discovered that WebKitGTK+ is displaying blank pages, the cause is a bad mesa update, mesa-18.2.3-1.fc29. This in turn was caused by a GCC bug that resulted in miscompilation of mesa.

To avoid this bug, downgrade to mesa-18.2.2-1.fc29:

$ sudo dnf downgrade mesa*

You can also update to mesa-18.2.4-2.fc29, but this build has not yet reached updates-testing, let alone stable, so downgrading is easier for now. Another workaround is to run your application with accelerated compositing mode disabled, to avoid OpenGL usage:

$ WEBKIT_DISABLE_COMPOSITING_MODE=1 epiphany

On the bright side of things, from all the bug reports I’ve received over the past two days I’ve discovered that lots of people use Epiphany and notice when it’s broken. That’s nice!

Huge thanks to Dave Airlie for quickly preparing the fixed mesa update, and to Jakub Jelenik for handling the same for GCC.

by Michael Catanzaro at November 07, 2018 02:28 AM

November 03, 2018

Michael Catanzaro

WebKitGTK+ 2.22.2 and 2.22.3, Media Source Extensions, and YouTube

Last month, I attended the Web Engines Hackfest (hosted by Igalia in A Coruña, Spain) and also the WebKit Contributors Meeting (hosted by Apple in San Jose, California). These are easily the two biggest WebKit development events of the year, and it’s always amazing to meet everyone in person yet again. A Coruña is an amazing city, and every browser developer ought to visit at least once. And the Contributors Meeting is a no-brainer event for WebKit developers.

One of the main discussion points this year was Media Source Extensions (MSE). MSE is basically a way for browsers to control how videos are downloaded. Until recently, if you were to play a YouTube video in Epiphany, you’d notice that the video loads way faster than it does in other browsers. This is because WebKitGTK+ — until recently — had no support for MSE. In other browsers, YouTube uses MSE to limit the speed at which video is downloaded, in order to reduce wasted bandwidth in case you stop watching the video before it ends. But with WebKitGTK+, MSE was not available, so videos would load as quickly as possible. MSE also makes it harder for browsers to offer the ability to download the videos; you’ll notice that neither Firefox nor Chrome offer to download the videos in their context menus, a feature that’s been available in Epiphany for as long as I remember.

So that sounds like it’s good to not have MSE. Well, the downside is that YouTube requires it in order to receive HD videos, to avoid that wasted bandwidth and to make it harder for users to download HD videos. And so WebKitGTK+ users have been limited to 720p video with H.264 and 480p video with WebM, where other browsers had access to 1080p and 1440p video. I’d been stuck with 480p video on Fedora for so long, I’d forgotten that internet video could look good.

Unfortunately, WebKitGTK+ was quite late to implement MSE. All other major browsers turned it on several years ago, but WebKitGTK+ dawdled. There was some code to support MSE, but it didn’t really work, and was disabled. And so it came to pass that, in September of this year, YouTube began to require MSE to access any WebM video, and we had a crisis. We don’t normally enable major new features in stable releases, but this was an exceptional situation and users would not be well-served by delaying until the next release cycle. So within a couple weeks, we were able to release WebKitGTK+ 2.22.2 and Epiphany 3.30.1 (both on September 21), and GStreamer 1.14.4 (on October 2, thanks to Tim-Philipp Müller for expediting that release). Collectively, these releases enabled basic video playback with MSE for users of GNOME 3.30. And if you still use of GNOME 3.28, worry not: you are still supported and can get MSE if you update to Epiphany 3.28.5 and also have the aforementioned versions of WebKitGTK+ and GStreamer.

MSE in WebKitGTK+ 2.22.2 had many rough edges because it was a mad rush to get the feature into a minimally-viable state, but those issues have been polished off in 2.22.3, which we released earlier this week on October 29. Be sure you have WebKitGTK+ 2.22.3, plus GStreamer 1.14.4, for a good experience on YouTube. Unfortunately we can’t provide support for older software versions anymore: if you don’t have GStreamer 1.14.4, then you’ll need to configure WebKitGTK+ with -DENABLE_MEDIA_SOURCE=OFF at build time and suffer from lack of MSE.

Epiphany 3.28.1 uses WebKitSettings to turn on the “enable-mediasource” setting. Turn that on if your application wants MSE now (if it’s a web browser, it certainly does). This setting will be enabled by default in WebKitGTK+ 2.24. Huge thanks to the talented developers who made this feature possible! Enjoy your 1080p and 1440p video.

by Michael Catanzaro at November 03, 2018 04:19 AM

On WebKit Build Options (Also: How to Accidentally Disable Important Security Features!)

When building WebKitGTK+, it’s a good idea to stick to the default values for the build options. If you’re building some sort of embedded system and really know what you’re doing, then OK, it might make sense to change some settings and disable some stuff. But Linux distros are generally well-advised to stick to the defaults to avoid creating problems for users.

One exception is if you need to disable certain features to avoid newer dependencies when building WebKit for older systems. For example, Ubuntu 18.04 disables web fonts (ENABLE_WOFF2=OFF) because it doesn’t have the libbrotli and libwoff2 dependencies that are required for that feature to work, hence some webpages will display using subpar fonts. And distributions shipping older versions of GStreamer will need to disable the ENABLE_MEDIA_SOURCE option (which is missing from the below feature list by mistake), since that requires the very latest GStreamer to work.

Other exceptions are the ENABLE_GTKDOC and ENABLE_MINIBROWSER settings, which distros do want. ENABLE_GTKDOC is disabled by default because it’s slow to build, and ENABLE_MINIBROWSER because, well, actually I don’t know why, you always want that one and it’s just annoying to find it’s not built.

OK, but really now, other than those exceptions, you should probably leave the defaults alone.

The feature list that prints when building WebKitGTK+ looks like this:

--  ENABLE_ACCELERATED_2D_CANVAS .......... OFF
--  ENABLE_DRAG_SUPPORT                     ON
--  ENABLE_GEOLOCATION .................... ON
--  ENABLE_GLES2                            OFF
--  ENABLE_GTKDOC ......................... OFF
--  ENABLE_ICONDATABASE                     ON
--  ENABLE_INTROSPECTION .................. ON
--  ENABLE_JIT                              ON
--  ENABLE_MINIBROWSER .................... OFF
--  ENABLE_OPENGL                           ON
--  ENABLE_PLUGIN_PROCESS_GTK2 ............ ON
--  ENABLE_QUARTZ_TARGET                    OFF
--  ENABLE_SAMPLING_PROFILER .............. ON
--  ENABLE_SPELLCHECK                       ON
--  ENABLE_TOUCH_EVENTS ................... ON
--  ENABLE_VIDEO                            ON
--  ENABLE_WAYLAND_TARGET ................. ON
--  ENABLE_WEBDRIVER                        ON
--  ENABLE_WEB_AUDIO ...................... ON
--  ENABLE_WEB_CRYPTO                       ON
--  ENABLE_X11_TARGET ..................... ON
--  USE_LIBHYPHEN                           ON
--  USE_LIBNOTIFY ......................... ON
--  USE_LIBSECRET                           ON
--  USE_SYSTEM_MALLOC ..................... OFF
--  USE_WOFF2                               ON

And, asides from the exceptions noted above, those are probably the options you want to ship with.

Why are some things disabled by default? ENABLE_ACCELERATED_2D_CANVAS is OFF by default because it is experimental (i.e. not great :) and requires CairoGL, which has been available in most distributions for about half a decade now, but still hasn’t reached Debian yet, because the Debian developers know that the Cairo developers consider CarioGL experimental (i.e. not great!). Many of our developers use Debian, and we’re not keen on having two separate sets of canvas bugs depending on whether you’re using Debian or not, so best keep this off for now. ENABLE_GLES2 switches you from desktop GL to GLES, which is maybe needed for embedded systems with crap proprietary graphics drivers, but certainly not what you want when building for a general-purpose distribution with mesa. Then ENABLE_QUARTZ_TARGET is for building on macOS, not for Linux. And then we come to USE_SYSTEM_MALLOC.

USE_SYSTEM_MALLOC disables WebKit’s bmalloc memory allocator (“fast malloc”) in favor of glibc malloc. bmalloc is performance-optimized for macOS, and I’m uncertain how its performance compares to glibc malloc on Linux. Doesn’t matter really, because bmalloc contains important heap security features that will be disabled if you switch to glibc malloc, and that’s all you need to know to decide which one to use. If you disable bmalloc, you lose the Gigacage, isolated heaps, heap subspaces, etc. I don’t pretend to understand how any of those things work, so I’ll just refer you to this explanation by Sam Brown, who sounds like he knows what he’s talking about. The point is that, if an attacker has found a memory vulnerability in WebKit, these heap security features make it much harder to exploit and take control of users’ computers, and you don’t want them turned off.

USE_SYSTEM_MALLOC is currently enabled (bad!) in openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise 15, presumably because when the Gigacage was originally introduced, it crashed immediately for users who set address space (virtual memory allocation) limits. Gigacage works by allocating a huge address space to reduce the chances that an attacker can find pointers within that space, similar to ASLR, so limiting the size of the address space prevents Gigacage from working. At first we thought it made more sense to crash than to allow a security feature to silently fail, but we got a bunch of complaints from users who use ulimit to limit the address space used by processes, and also from users who disable overcommit (which is required for Gigacage to allocate ludicrous amounts of address space), and so nowadays we just silently disable Gigacage instead if enough address space for it cannot be allocated. So hopefully there’s no longer any reason to disable this important security feature at build time! Distributions should be building with the default USE_SYSTEM_MALLOC=OFF.

The openSUSE CMake line currently looks like this:

%cmake \
  -DCMAKE_BUILD_TYPE=Release \
  -DLIBEXEC_INSTALL_DIR=%{_libexecdir}/libwebkit2gtk%{_wk2sover} \
  -DPORT=GTK \
%if 0%{?suse_version} == 1315
  -DCMAKE_C_COMPILER=gcc-7 \
  -DCMAKE_CXX_COMPILER=g++-7 \
  -DENABLE_WEB_CRYPTO=OFF \
  -DUSE_GSTREAMER_GL=false \
%endif
%if 0%{?suse_version} <= 1500
  -DUSE_WOFF2=false \
%endif
  -DENABLE_MINIBROWSER=ON \
%if %{with python3}
  -DPYTHON_EXECUTABLE=%{_bindir}/python3 \
%endif
%if !0%{?is_opensuse}
  -DENABLE_PLUGIN_PROCESS_GTK2=OFF \
%endif
%ifarch armv6hl ppc ppc64 ppc64le riscv64 s390 s390x
  -DENABLE_JIT=OFF \
%endif
  -DUSE_SYSTEM_MALLOC=ON \
  -DCMAKE_EXE_LINKER_FLAGS="-Wl,--as-needed -Wl,-z,now -pthread" \
  -DCMAKE_MODULE_LINKER_FLAGS="-Wl,--as-needed -Wl,-z,now -pthread" \
  -DCMAKE_SHARED_LINKER_FLAGS="-Wl,--as-needed -Wl,-z,now -pthread"

which all looks pretty reasonable to me: certain features that require “newer” dependencies are disabled on the old distros, and NPAPI plugins are not supported in the enterprise distro, and JIT doesn’t work on odd architectures. I would remove the ENABLE_JIT=OFF lines only because WebKit’s build system should be smart enough nowadays to disable it automatically to save you the trouble of thinking about which architectures the JIT works on. And I would also remove the -DUSE_SYSTEM_MALLOC=ON line to ensure users are properly protected.

by Michael Catanzaro at November 03, 2018 03:29 AM