Planet Igalia WebKit

April 08, 2019

Philippe Normand

Introducing WPEQt, a WPE API for Qt5

WPEQt provides a QML plugin implementing an API very similar to the QWebView API. This blog post explains the rationale behind this new project aimed for QtWebKit users.

Qt5 already provides multiple WebView APIs, one based on QtWebKit (deprecated) and one based on QWebEngine (aka Chromium). WPEQt aims to provide …

by Philippe Normand at April 08, 2019 10:20 AM

March 27, 2019

Michael Catanzaro

Epiphany 3.32 and WebKitGTK 2.24

I’m very pleased to (belatedly) announce the release of Epiphany 3.32 and WebKitGTK 2.24. This Epiphany release contains far more changes than usual, while WebKitGTK continues to improve steadily as well. There are a lot of new features to discuss, so let’s dive in.

Dazzling New Address Bar

The most noticeable change is the new address bar, based on libdazzle’s DzlSuggestionEntry. Christian put a lot of effort into designing this search bar to work for both Builder and Epiphany, and Jan-Michael helped integrate it into Epiphany. The result is much nicer than we had before:

The address bar is a central component of the user interface, and this clean design is important to provide a quality user experience. It should also leave a much better first impression than we had before.

Redesigned Tabs Menu

Epiphany 3.24 first added a tab menu at the end of the tab bar. This isn’t very useful if you have only a few tabs open, but if you have a huge number of tabs then it’s useful to help navigate through them. Previously, this menu only showed the page titles of the tabs. For 3.32, Adrien has converted this menu to a nice popover, including favicons, volume indicators, and close buttons. These enhancements were primarily aimed at making the browser easier to use on mobile devices, where there is no tab bar, but they’re nice improvement for desktop users, too.

(On mobile, the tab rows are much larger, to make touch selection easier.)

Touchpad Gestures

Epiphany now supports touchpad gestures. Jan-Michael first added a three-finger swipe to Epiphany, for navigating back and forward. Then Alexander (Exalm) decided to go and rewrite it, pushing the implementation down into WebKit to share as much code as possible with Safari. The end result is a two-finger swipe. This was much more involved than I expected as it required converting a bunch of Apple-specific Objective C++ code into cross-platform C++, but the end result was worth the effort:

Applications that depend on WebKitGTK 2.24 may opt-in to these gestures using webkit_settings_set_enable_back_forward_navigation_gestures().

Alexander also added pinch zoom.

Variable Fonts

Carlos Garcia decided to devote some attention to WebKit’s FreeType font backend, and the result speaks for itself:

Emoji 🦇

WebKit’s FreeType backend has supported emoji for some time, but there were a couple problems:

  • Most emoji combinations were not supported, so while characters like🧟(zombie) would work just fine, characters like 🧟‍♂️(man zombie) and 🧟‍♀️(woman zombie) were broken. Carlos fixed this. (Technically, only emoji combinations using a certain character code were broken, but that was most of them.)
  • There was no code to prefer emoji fonts for rendering emoji, meaning emoji would almost always be displayed in non-ideal fonts, usually DejaVu, resulting in a black and white glyph rather than color. Carlos fixed this, too. This seems to work properly in Firefox on some websites but not others, and it’s currently WONTFIXed in Chrome. It’s good to see WebKit ahead of the game, for once. Note that you’ll see color on this page regardless of your browser, because WordPress replaces the emoji characters with images, but I believe only WebKit can handle the characters themselves. You can test your browser here.

Improved Adaptive Mode

First introduced in 3.30, Adrien has continued to improve adaptive mode to ensure Epiphany works well on mobile devices. 3.32 is the first release to depend on libhandy. Adrien has converted various portions of the UI to use libhandy widgets.

Reader Mode

Jan-Michael’s reader mode has been available since 3.30, but new to 3.32 are many style improvements and new preferences to choose between dark and light theme, and between sans and serif font, thanks to Adrian (who is, confusingly, not Adrien). The default, sans on light background, still looks the best to me, but if you like serif fonts or dark backgrounds, now you can have them.

JPEG 2000

Wait, JPEG 2000? The obscure image standard not supported by Chrome or Firefox? Why would we add support for this? Simple: websites are using it. A certain piece of popular server-side software is serving JPEG 2000 images in place of normal JPEGs and even in place of PNG images to browsers with Safari-style user agents. (The software in question doesn’t even bother to change the file extensions. We’ve found far too many images in the wild ending in .png that are actually JPEG 2000.) Since this software is used on a fairly large number of websites, and our user agent is too fragile to change, we decided to support JPEG 2000 in order to make these websites work properly. So Carlos has implemented JPEG 2000 support, using the OpenJPEG library.

This isn’t a happy event for the web, because WebKit is only as secure as its least-secure dependency, and adding new obscure image formats is not a step in the right direction. But in this case,  it is necessary.

Mouse Gestures

Experimental mouse gesture support is now available, thanks to Jan-Michael, if you’re willing to use the command line to enable it:

$ gsettings set org.gnome.Epiphany.web:/org/gnome/epiphany/web/ enable-mouse-gestures true

With this, I find myself closing tabs by dragging the mouse down and then to the right. Down and back up will reload the tab. Straight to the left is Back, straight to the right is Forward. Straight down will open a new tab. I had originally hoped to use the right mouse button for this, as in Opera, but turns out there is a difference in context menu behavior: whereas Windows apps normally pop up the context menu on button release, GTK apps open the menu on button press. That means the context menu would appear at the start of every mouse gesture. And that is certainly no good, so we’ve opted to use the middle mouse button instead. We aren’t sure whether this is a good state of things, and need your feedback to decide where to go with this feature.

Improved Fullscreen Mode

A cool side benefit of using libdazzle is that the header bar is now available in fullscreen mode by pressing the mouse towards the top of the screen. There’s even a nice animation to show the header bar sliding up to the top of the screen, so you know it’s there (animation disabled for fullscreen video).

The New Tab Button

Some users were disconcerted that the new tab button would jump from the end of the tab bar (when multiple tabs are open) back up to the end of the header bar (when there is only one tab open). Now this button will remain in one place: the header bar. Since it will no longer appear in the tab bar, Jan-Michael has moved it back to the start of the header bar, where it was from 3.12 through 3.22, rather than the end. This is mostly arbitrary, but makes for a somewhat more balanced layout.

The history of the new tab button is rather fun: when the new tab button was first added in 3.8, it was added at the end of the header bar, but moved to the start in 3.12 to be more consistent with gedit, then moved back to the end in 3.24 to reduce the distance it would need to move to reach the tab bar. So we’ve come full circle here, twice. Only time will tell if this nomadic button will finally be able to stay put.

New Icon

Yes, most GNOME applications have a new icon in 3.32, so Epiphany is not special here. But I just can’t resist the urge to show it off. Thanks, Jakub!

And More…

It’s impossible to mention all the improvements in 3.32 in a single blog post, but I want to squeeze a few more in.

Alexander (Exalm) landed several improvements to Epiphany’s theme, especially the incognito mode theme, which needed work to look good with the new Adwaita in 3.32.

Jan-Michael added an animation for completed downloads, so we don’t need to annoyingly pop open the download popover anymore to let you know that your download has completed.

Carlos Garcia added support for automation mode. This means Epiphany can now be used for running automated tests with WebDriver (e.g. with Selenium). Using the new automation mode, I’ve upstreamed support for running tests with Epiphany to the Web Platform Tests (WPT) project, the test suite used by web engine developers to test standards conformance.

Carlos also reworked the implementation of script dialogs so that they are now modal only to their associated web view, not modal to the entire application. This means you can just close the browser tab if a particular website is abusing script dialogs in a problematic way, e.g. by continuously opening new dialogs.

Patrick has improved the directory layout Epiphany uses to store data on disk to avoid storing non-configuration data under ~/.config, and reworked the internals of the password manager to mitigate Spectre-related concerns. He also implemented Happy Eyeballs support in GLib, so Epiphany will now fall back to an IPv4 connection if IPv6 is available but broken.

Now Contains 100% Less Punctuation!

Did you notice any + signs missing in this blog? Following GTK+’s rename to GTK, WebKitGTK+ has been renamed to WebKitGTK. You’re welcome.

Whither Pop!_OS?

Extra Credit

Although Epiphany 3.32 has been the work of many developers, as you’ve seen, I want to give special credit Epiphany’s newest maintainer, Jan-Michael. He has closed a considerable number of bugs, landed too many improvements to mention here, and has been a tremendous help. Thank you!

Now, onward to 3.34!

by Michael Catanzaro at March 27, 2019 12:41 PM

March 19, 2019

Michael Catanzaro

Epiphany Technology Preview Upgrade Requires Manual Intervention

Jan-Michael has recently changed Epiphany Technology Preview to use a separate app ID. Instead of org.gnome.Epiphany, it will now be org.gnome.Epiphany.Devel, to avoid clashing with your system version of Epiphany. You can now have separate desktop icons for both system Epiphany and Epiphany Technology Preview at the same time.

Because flatpak doesn’t provide any way to rename an app ID, this means it’s the end of the road for previous installations of Epiphany Technology Preview. Manual intervention is required to upgrade. Fortunately, this is a one-time hurdle, and it is not hard:

$ flatpak uninstall org.gnome.Epiphany

Uninstall the old Epiphany…

$ flatpak install gnome-apps-nightly org.gnome.Epiphany.Devel org.gnome.Epiphany.Devel.Debug

…install the new one, assuming that your remote is named gnome-apps-nightly (the name used locally may differ), and that you also want to install debuginfo to make it possible to debug it…

$ mv ~/.var/app/org.gnome.Epiphany ~/.var/app/org.gnome.Epiphany.Devel

…and move your personal data from the old app to the new one.

Then don’t forget to make it your default web browser under System Settings -> Details -> Default Applications. Thanks for testing Epiphany Technology Preview!

by Michael Catanzaro at March 19, 2019 06:39 PM

February 26, 2019

Frédéric Wang

Review of Igalia's Web Platform activities (H2 2018)

This blog post reviews Igalia’s activity around the Web Platform, focusing on the second semester of 2018.

Projects

MathML

During 2018 we have continued discussions to implement MathML in Chromium with Google and people interested in math layout. The project was finally launched early this year and we have encouraging progress. Stay tuned for more details!

Javascript

As mentioned in the previous report, Igalia has proposed and developed the specification for BigInt, enabling math on arbitrary-sized integers in JavaScript. We’ve continued to land patches for BigInt support in SpiderMonkey and JSC. For the latter, you can watch this video demonstrating the current support. Currently, these two support are under a preference flag but we hope to make it enable by default after we are done polishing the implementations. We also added support for BigInt to several Node.js APIs (e.g. fs.Stat or process.hrtime.bigint).

Regarding “object-oriented” features, we submitted patches private and public instance fields support to JSC and they are pending review. At the same time, we are working on private methods for V8

We contributed other nice features to V8 such as a spec change for template strings and iterator protocol, support for Object.fromEntries, Symbol.prototype.description, miscellaneous optimizations.

At TC39, we maintained or developed many proposals (BigInt, class fields, private methods, decorators, …) and led the ECMAScript Internationalization effort. Additionally, at the WebAssembly Working Group we edited the WebAssembly JS and Web API and early version of WebAssembly/ES Module integration specifications.

Last but not least, we contributed various conformance tests to test262 and Web Platform Tests to ensure interoperability between the various features mentioned above (BigInt, Class fields, Private methods…). In Node.js, we worked on the new Web Platform Tests driver with update automation and continued porting and fixing more Web Platform Tests in Node.js core.

We also worked on the new Web Platform Tests driver with update automation, and continued porting and fixing more Web Platform Tests in Node.js core. Outside of core, we implemented the initial JavaScript API for llnode, a Node.js/V8 plugin for the LLDB debugger.

Accessibility

Igalia has continued its involvement at the W3C. We have achieved the following:

We are also collaborating with Google to implement ATK support in Chromium. This work will make it possible for users of the Orca screen reader to use Chrome/Chromium as their browser. During H2 we began implementing the foundational accessibility support. During H1 2019 we will continue this work. It is our hope that sufficient progress will be made during H2 2019 for users to begin using Chrome with Orca.

Web Platform Predictability

On Web Platform Predictability, we’ve continued our collaboration with AMP to do bug fixes and implement new features in WebKit. You can read a review of the work done in 2018 on the AMP blog post.

We have worked on a lot of interoperability issues related to editing and selection thanks to financial support from Bloomberg. For example when deleting the last cell of a table some browsers keep an empty table while others delete the whole table. The latter can be problematic, for example if users press backspace continuously to delete a long line, they can accidentally end up deleting the whole table. This was fixed in Chromium and WebKit.

Another issue is that style is lost when transforming some text into list items. When running execCommand() with insertOrderedList/insertUnorderedList on some styled paragraph, the new list item loses the original text’s style. This behavior is not interoperable and we have proposed a fix so that Firefox, Edge, Safari and Chrome behave the same for this operation. We landed a patch for Chromium. After discussion with Apple, it was decided not to implement this change in Safari as it would break some iOS rich text editor apps, mismatching the required platform behavior.

We have also been working on CSS Grid interoperability. We imported Web Platform Tests into WebKit (cf bugs 191515 and 191369 and at the same time completing the missing features and bug fixes so that browsers using WebKit are interoperable, passing 100% of the Grid test suite. For details, see 191358, 189582, 189698, 191881, 191938, 170175, 191473 and 191963. Last but not least, we are exporting more than 100 internal browser tests to the Web Platform test suite.

CSS

Bloomberg is supporting our work to develop new CSS features. One of the new exciting features we’ve been working on is CSS Containment. The goal is to improve the rendering performance of web pages by isolating a subtree from the rest of the document. You can read details on Manuel Rego’s blog post.

Regarding CSS Grid Layout we’ve continued our maintenance duties, bug triage of the Chromium and WebKit bug trackers, and fixed the most severe bugs. One change with impact on end users was related to how percentages row tracks and gaps work in grid containers with indefinite size, the last spec resolution was implemented in both Chromium and WebKit. We are finishing the level 1 of the specification with some missing/incomplete features. First we’ve been working on the new Baseline Alignment algorithm (cf. CSS WG issues 1039, 1365 and 1409). We fixed related issues in Chromium and WebKit. Similarly, we’ve worked on Content Alignment logic (see CSS WG issue 2557) and resolved a bug in Chromium. The new algorithm for baseline alignment caused an important performance regression for certain resizing use cases so we’ve fixed them with some performance optimization and that landed in Chromium.

We have also worked on various topics related to CSS Text 3. We’ve fixed several bugs to increase the pass rate for the Web Platform test suite in Chromium such as bugs 854624, 900727 and 768363. We are also working on a new CSS value ‘break-spaces’ for the ‘white-space’ property. For details, see the CSS WG discussions: issue 2465 and pull request. We implemented this new property in Chromium under a CSSText3BreakSpaces flag. Additionally, we are currently porting this implementation to Chromium’s new layout engine ‘LayoutNG’. We have plans to implement this feature in WebKit during the second semester.

Multimedia

  • WebRTC: The libwebrtc branch is now upstreamed in WebKit and has been tested with popular servers.
  • Media Source Extensions: WebM MSE support is upstreamed in WebKit.
  • We implemented basic support for <video> and <audio> elements in Servo.

Other activities

Web Engines Hackfest 2018

Last October, we organized the Web Engines Hackfest at our A Coruña office. It was a great event with about 70 attendees from all the web engines, thank you to all the participants! As usual, you can find more information on the event wiki including link to slides and videos of speakers.

TPAC 2018

Again in October, but this time in Lyon (France), 12 people from Igalia attended TPAC and participated in several discussions on the different meetings. Igalia had a booth there showcasing several demos of our last developments running on top of WPE (a WebKit port for embedded devices). Last, Manuel Rego gave a talk on the W3C Developers Meetup about how to contribute to CSS.

This.Javascript: State of Browsers

In December, we also participated with other browser developers to the online This.Javascript: State of Browsers event organized by ThisDot. We talked more specifically about the current work in WebKit.

New Igalians

We are excited to announce that new Igalians are joining us to continue our Web platform effort:

  • Cathie Chen, a Chinese engineer with about 10 years of experience working on browsers. Among other contributions to Chromium, she worked on the new LayoutNG code and added support for list markers.

  • Caio Lima a Brazilian developer who recently graduated from the Federal University of Bahia. He participated to our coding experience program and notably worked on BigInt support in JSC.

  • Oriol Brufau a recent graduate in math from Barcelona who is also involved in the CSSWG and the development of various browser engines. He participated to our coding experience program and implemented the CSS Logical Properties and Values in WebKit and Chromium.

Coding Experience Programs

Last fall, Sven Sauleau joined our coding experience program and started to work on various BigInt/WebAssembly improvements in V8.

Conclusion

We are thrilled with the web platform achievements we made last semester and we look forward to more work on the web platform in 2019!

February 26, 2019 11:00 PM

Miguel A. Gómez

Hole punching in WPE

As you may (or may not) know, WPE (and WebKitGtk+ if the proper flags are enabled) uses OpengGL textures to render the video frames during playback.

In order to do this, WPE creates a playbin and uses a custom bin as videosink. This bin is composed by some GStreamer-GL components together with an appsink. The GL components ensure that the video frames are uploaded to OpenGL textures, while the appsink allows the player to get a signal when a new frame arrives. When this signal is emitted, the player gets the frame as a texture from the appsink and sends it to the accelerated compositor to be composed with the rest of the layers of the page.

This process is quite fast due to the hardware accelerated drawings, and as the video frames are just another layer that is composited, it allows them to be transformed and animated: the video can be scaled, rotated, moved around the page, etc.

But there are some platforms where this approach is not viable, maybe because there’s no OpenGL support, or it’s too slow, or maybe the platform has some kind of fast path support to take the decoded frames to the display. For these cases, the typical solution is to draw a transparent rectangle on the brower, in the position where the video should be, and then use some platform dependent way to put the video frames in a display plane below the browser, so they are visible through the transparent rectangle. This approach is called hole punching, as it refers to punching a hole in the browser to be able to see the video.

At Igalia we think that supporting this feature is interesting, and following our philosophy of collaborating upstream as much as possible, we have added two hole punching approaches to the WPE upstream trunk: GStreamer hole punch and external hole punch.

GStreamer hole punch

The idea behind this implementation is to use the existent GStreamer based MediaPlayer to perform the media playback, but replace the appsink (and maybe other GStreamer elements) with a platform dependant video sink that is in charge of putting the video frames on the display. This can be enabled with the -DUSE_GSTREAMER_HOLEPUNCH flag.

Of course, the current implementation is not complete cause the platform dependent bits need to be added to have the full functionality. What it currently does is to use a fakevideosink so the video frames are not shown, and draw the transparent rectangle on the position where the video should be. If you enable the feature and play a video, you’ll see the transparent rectangle and you’ll be able to hear the video sound (and even use the video controls as they work), but nothing else will happen.

In order to have the full functionality there are a couple of places in the code that need to be modified to create the appropriate platform dependend elements. These two places are inside MediaPlayerPrivateGStreamerBase.cpp, and they are the createHolePunchVideoSink() and setRectangleToVideoSink() functions.

GstElement* MediaPlayerPrivateGStreamerBase::createHolePunchVideoSink()
{
    // Here goes the platform-dependant code to create the videoSink. As a default
    // we use a fakeVideoSink so nothing is drawn to the page.
    GstElement* videoSink =  gst_element_factory_make("fakevideosink", nullptr);

    return videoSink;
}
static void setRectangleToVideoSink(GstElement* videoSink, const IntRect& rect)
{
    // Here goes the platform-dependant code to set to the videoSink the size
    // and position of the video rendering window. Mark them unused as default.
    UNUSED_PARAM(videoSink);
    UNUSED_PARAM(rect);
}

The first one, createHolePunchVideoSink() needs to be modified to create the appropriate video sink to use for the platform. This video sink needs to have some method that allows setting the position where the video frames are to be displayed, and the size they should have. And this is where setRectangleToVideoSink() comes into play. Whenever the transparent rectangle is painted by the browser, it will tell the video sink to render the frames to the appropriate position, and it does so using that function. So you need to modify that function to use the appropriate way to set the size and position to the video sink.

And that’s all. Once those changes are made the feature is complete, and the video should be placed exactly where the transparent rectangle is.

Something to take into account is that the size and position of the video rectangle are defined by the CSS values of the video element. The rectangle won’t be adjusted to fit the aspect ratio of the video, as that must be done by the platform video sink.

Also, the video element allows some animations to be performed: it can be translated and scaled, and it will properly notify the video sink about the animated changes. But, of course, it doesn’t support rotation or 3D transformations (as the normal video playback does). Take into account that there might be a small desynchronization between the transparent rectangle and the video frames size and position, due to the asynchronicity of some function calls.

Playing a video with GStreamer hole punch enabled.

External hole punch

Unlike the previous feature, this one doesn’t rely at all on GStreamer to perform the media playback. Instead, it just paints the transparent rectangle and lets the playback to be handled entirely by an external player.

Of course, there’s still the matter about how to synchronize the transparent rectangle position and the external player. There would be two ways to do this:

  • Implement a new WebKit MediaPlayerPrivate class that would communicate with the external player (through sockets, the injected bundle or any other way). WPE would use that to tell the platform media player what to play and where to render the result. This is completely dependant of the platform, and the most complex solution, but it would allow to use the browser to play content from any page without any change. But precisely as it’s completely platform dependant, this is not valid approach for upstream.
  • Use javascript to communicate with the native player, telling it what to play and where, and WPE would just paint the transparent rectangle. The problem with this is that we need to have control of the page to add the javascript code that controls the native player, but on the other hand, we can implement a generic approach on WPE to paint the transparent rectangle. This is the option that was implemented upstream.

So, how can this feature be used? It’s enabled by using the -DUSE_EXTERNAL_HOLEPUNCH flag, and what it does is add a new dummy MediaPlayer to WPE that’s selected to play content of type video/holepunch. This dummy MediaPlayer will draw the transparent rectangle on the page, according to the CSS values defined, and won’t do anything else. It’s up to the page owners to add the javascript code required to initiate the playback with the native player and position the output in the appropriate place under the transparent rectangle. To be a bit more specific, the dummy player will draw the transparent rectangle once the type has been set to video/holepunch and load() is called on the player. If you have any doubt about how to make this work, you can give a look to the video-player-holepunch-external.html test inside the ManualTests/wpe directory.

This implementation doesn’t support animating the size and position of the video… well, it really does, as the transparent rectangle will be properly animated, but you would need to animate the native player’s output as well, and syncing the rectangle area and the video output is going to be a challenging task.

As a last detail, controls can be enabled using this hole punch implementation, but they are useless. As WPE doesn’t know anything about the media playback that’s happening, the video element controls can’t be used to handle it, so it’s just better to keep them disabled.

Using both implementations together

You may be wondering, is it possible to use both implementations at the same time? Indeed it is!! You may be using the GStreamer holepunch to perform media playback with some custom GStreamer elements. At some point you may find a video that is not supported by GStreamer and you can just set the type of the video element to video/holepunch and start the playback with the native player. And once that video is finished, start using the GStreamer MediaPlayer again.

Availability

Both hole punch features will be available on the upcoming stable 2.24 release (and, of course, on 2.25 development releases). I hope they are useful for you!

by magomez at February 26, 2019 10:25 AM

February 11, 2019

Víctor Jáquez

Review of Igalia’s Multimedia Activities (2018/H2)

This is the first semiyearly report about Igalia’s activities around multimedia, covering the second half of 2018.

Great length of this report was exposed in Phil’s talk surveying mutimedia development in WebKitGTK and WPE:

WebKit Media Source Extensions (MSE)

MSE is a specification that allows JS to generate media streams for playback for Web browsers that support HTML 5 video and audio.

Last semester we upstreamed the support to WebM format in WebKitGTK with the related patches in GStreamer, particularly in qtdemux, matroskademux elements.

WebKit Encrypted Media Extensions (EME)

EME is a specification for enabling playback of encrypted content in Web bowsers that support HTML 5 video.

In a downstream project for WPE WebKit we managed to have almost full test coverage in the YoutubeTV 2018 test suite.

We merged our contributions in upstream, WebKit and GStreamer, most of what is legal to publish, for example, making demuxers aware of encrypted content and make them to send protection events with the initialization data and the encrypted caps, in order to select later the decryption key.

We started to coordinate the upstreaming process of a new implementation of CDM (Content Decryption Module) abstraction and there will be even changes in that abstraction.

Lighting talk about EME implementation in WPE/WebKitGTK in GStreamer Conference 2018.

WebKit WebRTC

WebRTC consists of several interrelated APIs and real time protocols to enable Web applications and sites to captures audio, or A/V streams, and exchange them between browsers without requiring an intermediary.

We added GStreamer interfaces to LibWebRTC, to use it for the network part, while using GStreamer for the media capture and processing. All that was upstreamed in 2018 H2.

Thibault described thoroughly the tasks done for this achievement.

Talk about WebRTC implementation in WPE/WebKitGTK in WebEngines hackfest 2018.

Servo/media

Servo is a browser engine written in Rust designed for high parallelization and high GPU usage.

We added basic support for <video> and <audio> media elements in Servo. Later on, we added the GstreamerGL bindings for Rust in gstreamer-rs to render GL textures from the GStreamer pipeline in Servo.

Lighting talk in the GStreamer Conference 2018.

GstWPE

Taking an idea from the GStreamer Conference, we developed a GStreamer source element that wraps WPE. With this source element, it is possible to blend a web page and video in a single video stream; that is, the output of a Web browser (to say, a rendered web page) is used as a video source of a GStreamer pipeline: GstWPE. The element is already merged in the gst-plugins-bad repository.

Talk about GstWPE in FOSDEM 2019

Demo #1

Demo #2

GStreamer VA-API and gst-MSDK

At last, but not the least, we continued helping with the maintenance of GStreamer-VAAPI and gst-msdk, with code reviewing and on-going migration of the internal library to GObject.

Other activities

The second half of 2018 was also intense in terms of conferences and hackfest for the team:


Thanks to bear with us along all this blog post and to keeping under your radar our work.

by vjaquez at February 11, 2019 12:52 PM

January 08, 2019

Carlos García Campos

Epiphany automation mode

Last week I finally found some time to add the automation mode to Epiphany, that allows to run automated tests using WebDriver. It’s important to note that the automation mode is not expected to be used by users or applications to control the browser remotely, but only by WebDriver automated tests. For that reason, the automation mode is incompatible with a primary user profile. There are a few other things affected by the auotmation mode:

  • There’s no persistency. A private profile is created in tmp and only ephemeral web contexts are used.
  • URL entry is not editable, since users are not expected to interact with the browser.
  • An info bar is shown to notify the user that the browser is being controlled by automation.
  • The window decoration is orange to make it even clearer that the browser is running in automation mode.

So, how can I write tests to be run in Epiphany? First, you need to install a recently enough selenium. For now, only the python API is supported. Selenium doesn’t have an Epiphany driver, but the WebKitGTK driver can be used with any WebKitGTK+ based browser, by providing the browser information as part of session capabilities.

from selenium import webdriver

options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
options.set_capability('browserName', 'Epiphany')
options.set_capability('version', '3.31.4')

ephy = webdriver.WebKitGTK(options=options, desired_capabilities={})
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

This is a very simple example that just opens Epiphany in automation mode, loads http://www.webkitgtk.org and closes Epiphany. A few comments about the example:

  • Version 3.31.4 will be the first one including the automation mode.
  • The parameter desired_capabilities shouldn’t be needed, but there’s a bug in selenium that has been fixed very recently.
  • WebKitGTKOptions.set_capability was added in selenium 3.14, if you have an older version you can use the following snippet instead
from selenium import webdriver

options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
capabilities = options.to_capabilities()
capabilities['browserName'] = 'Epiphany'
capabilities['version'] = '3.31.4'

ephy = webdriver.WebKitGTK(desired_capabilities=capabilities)
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

To simplify the driver instantation you can create your own Epiphany driver derived from the WebKitGTK one:

from selenium import webdriver

class Epiphany(webdriver.WebKitGTK):
    def __init__(self):
        options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
        options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
        options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
        options.set_capability('browserName', 'Epiphany')
        options.set_capability('version', '3.31.4')

        webdriver.WebKitGTK.__init__(self, options=options, desired_capabilities={})

ephy = Epiphany()
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

The same for selenium < 3.14

from selenium import webdriver

class Epiphany(webdriver.WebKitGTK):
    def __init__(self):
        options = webdriver.WebKitGTKOptions()
        options.binary_location = 'epiphany'
        options.add_argument('--automation-mode')
        capabilities = options.to_capabilities()
        capabilities['browserName'] = 'Epiphany'
        capabilities['version'] = '3.31.4'

        webdriver.WebKitGTK.__init__(self, desired_capabilities=capabilities)

ephy = Epiphany()
ephy.get('http://www.webkitgtk.org')
ephy.quit()

by carlos garcia campos at January 08, 2019 05:22 PM